Undergraduate Fall 2018

Fall 2018 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

(CLICK HERE FOR ILLUSTRATED PDF OF FALL 2018 UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES)

Classes are listed alphabetically according to their first department listing. For the most up-to-date listings, check the Yale Course Search  website. ​To add or remove a course from this list, email environmentalhumanities@yale.edu.

AMST 331 01 (14422)

Photographing the City: Urban Pictures, Urban Places

Kristin Hankins

How do we see places? How do we see boundaries? How do our practices of looking reproduce, complicate, and transform places? This junior seminar explores these questions through an engagement with American urban places and analysis of their representations throughout the 20th century, beginning with photography at the turn of the century and ending with contemporary social practice art projects. We analyze the relationship between visual culture and public space; the ways in which urban visual culture conceals and reveals power dynamics; and different ways of approaching, engaging, and representing urban places. The primary objective is to foster critical engagement with urban space and its representations—to develop an analytical framework which grounds exploration of the impact of representational strategies on experiences of space and vice versa.  

ANTH 232 01 (10450) /ARCG 232/LAST 232

Ancient Civilizations of the Andes

Richard Burger

TTh 2.30-3.45

Areas Hu

YC Anthropology: Archaeology

Survey of the archaeological cultures of Peru and Bolivia from the earliest settlement through the late Inca state.

ANTH 244 01 (13964)

Modern Southeast Asia

Eve Zucker

MW 2.30-3.45

Areas So

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of Southeast Asia, with special emphasis on the challenges of modernization, development, and globalization. Southeast Asian history, literature, arts, belief systems, agriculture, industrialization and urbanization, politics, ecological challenges, and economic change.

ANTH 322 01 (10458) /EVST 324/SAST 306

Environmental Justice in South Asia

Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan

Th 1.30-3.20

Areas So

1 HTBA

Study of South Asia’s nation building and economic development in the aftermath of war and decolonization in the 20th century. How it generated unprecedented stress on natural environments; increased social disparity; and exposure of the poor and minorities to environmental risks and loss of homes, livelihoods, and cultural resources. Discussion of the rise of environmental justice movements and policies in the region as the world comes to grips with living in the Anthropocene.

ANTH 409 01 (11042) /EVST 422/ER&M 394/F&ES 422

Climate and Society from Past to Present

Michael Dove

Th 1.30-3.20

Areas So

1 HTBA

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

Discussion of the major traditions of thought—both historic and contemporary—regarding climate, climate change, and society; focusing on the politics of knowledge and belief vs disbelief; and drawing on the social sciences and anthropology in particular.

ANTH 478 01 (11037) /EVST 399/ARCG 399/NELC 399

Agriculture: Origins, Evolution, Crises

Harvey Weiss

Th 3.30-5.20

Areas So

Analysis of the societal and environmental drivers and effects of plant and animal domestication, the intensification of agroproduction, and the crises of agroproduction: land degradation, societal collapses, sociopolitical transformation, sustainability, and biodiversity.

ARCG 207 01 (13736) /ANTH 207

The Sustainable Preservation of Cultural Heritage

Stefan Simon

F 9.25-11.15

Understanding the complex factors that challenge the preservation of cultural heritage through introduction to scientific techniques for condition assessment and preservation, including materials analysis and digitization tools in the lab and in the field. Students learn about collection care and the science used to detect forgeries and fakes; international legal and professional frameworks that enable cross-cultural efforts to combat trafficking in antiquities; and how to facilitate preservation.

ARCG 226 01 (11023) /EVST 226/NELC 268

Global Environmental History

Harvey Weiss

TTh 9.00-10.15

Areas So

The dynamic relationship between environmental and social forces from the Pleistocene glaciations to the Anthropocene present. Pleistocene extinctions; transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture; origins of cities, states, and civilization; adaptations and collapses of Old and New World civilizations in the face of climate disasters; the destruction and reconstruction of the New World by the Old. Focus on issues of adaptation, resilience, and sustainability, including forces that caused long-term societal change.

ARCH 006 01 (13623)

Architectures of Urbanism: Thinking, Seeing, Writing the City

Michael Schlabs

TTh 11.35-12.50

Areas Hu

What is architecture, and how is it conceived, relative to notions of the urban – to the broader, deeper, messier web of ideas, forms, and fantasies constituting “the city?” Can architecture play a role in defining the city, as such, or does the city’s political and social construction place it outside the scope of specifically architectural concerns? Likewise, what role can the city play in establishing, interrogating, and extrapolating the limits of architecture, whether as a practice, a discourse, or a physical manifestation of human endeavor in the material environment? This course addresses these and other related questions, seeking to position architecture in its broader urban, social, cultural, political, intellectual, and aesthetic contexts. In so doing, it assumes the position that the nature and character of the urban can largely be characterized in terms of the manner in which we, as a society, conceive, construct, and contribute to notions of “the public,” or “the common.”

Prerequisite: general knowledge of 20th-century history.

ART 013 01 (10530)

Temperamental Spaces

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

Spaces can sometimes appear as idiosyncratic as the people within them, taking on characteristics we usually ascribe to ourselves. They can appear erratic, comforting, uncanny–even threatening. Working like a therapy session for architecture, the body, and the objects around us, this seminar analyzes a diverse collection of readings and works, ranging from Renaissance mysticism to conceptual art and film, to explore how the visual arts have utilized a productive, but skeptical, relationship with space. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

ART 450 01 (10564)

Interiors as Cinema

Corey McCorkle

Th 8.25-12.20

1 HTBA

This class is an extension of ‘Landscape as Cinema’ and reconsiders both the ‘studio’ in the history of the moving image and our understanding of ‘interiors’ as described by film. The Black Maria, the first motion picture studio in the United States, was invented by Thomas Edison in 1893. This tar-papered ‘studio’ looked like a small house, and would be rotated by horse to catch the best light of the day for filming therein. This unfixed interior at the origin of the moving image is our chimerical inspiration throughout the semester. After a semester long investigation involving the intense analysis of the moving image in general, our final collective project involves reconstructing this particular site (the studio) and shooting something therein.

Students should be somewhat fluent in visual and narrative history; film expertise is not required.

EALL 293 01 (14419)

Hiroshima to Fukushima: Ecology and Culture in Japan

Stephen Poland

TTh 1.00-2.15

This course explores how Japanese literature, cinema, and popular culture have engaged with questions of environment, ecology, pollution, and climate change from the wake of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945 to the ongoing Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in the present. Environmental disasters and the slow violence of their aftermath have had an enormous impact on Japanese cultural production, and we examine how these cultural forms seek to negotiate and work through questions of representing the unrepresentable, victimhood and survival, trauma and national memory, uneven development and discrimination, the human and the nonhuman, and climate change’s impact on imagining the future. Special attention is given to the possibilities and limitations of different forms—the novel, poetry, film, manga, anime—that Japanese writers and artists have to think about humans’ relationship with the environment.

ENGL 114

WRITING SEMINARS

Landscape and the Environment Section 18 (14459)

Jakub Koguciuk

TTh 1.00-2.15

Logistics of Climate Change Section 19 (14460)

Timothy Kreiner

TTh 11.35-12.50

Health, Religion, and Morality Section 25 (14468)

TTh 2.30-3.45

The Real World of Food Section 32 (14475)

Barbara Stuart

TTh 11.35-12.50

Skills WR

1 HTBA

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as the city, childhood, globalization, inequality, food culture, sports, and war.

ENGL 115

LITERATURE SEMINARS

Literature Labor and Climate Change Section 95 (13099)

Katja Lindskog

MW 9.00-10.15

Literary Journeys and Other Worlds Section 07 (14040)

Wing Chun Julia Chan

TTh 2.30-3.45

Skills WR

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

Exploration of major themes in selected works of literature. Individual sections focus on topics such as war, justice, childhood, sex and gender, the supernatural, and the natural world. Emphasis on the development of writing skills and the analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction prose.

ENGL 241 01 (11021) /EVST 224

Writing About The Environment

Alan Burdick

Th 1.30-3.20

YC English: Creative Writing

Exploration of ways in which the environment and the natural world can be channeled for literary expression. Reading and discussion of essays, reportage, and book-length works, by scientists and non-scientists alike. Students learn how to create narrative tension while also conveying complex—sometimes highly technical—information; the role of the first person in this type of writing; and where the human environment ends and the non-human one begins.

ENGL 278 01 (10971) /AMST 281

Antebellum American Literature

Michael Warner

TTh 1.00-2.15

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Introduction to writing from the period leading up to and through the Civil War. The growth of African American writing in an antislavery context; the national book market and its association with national culture; emergence of a language of environment; romantic ecology and American pastoral; the “ecological Indian”; evangelicalism and the secular; sentimentalism and gender; the emergence of sexuality; poetics.

ENGL 287 01 (10973)

Literature and the Future, 1887 to the Present

Robert Williams

MW 2.30-3.45

Skills WR

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

YC English: 20th/21st Century

YC English: Junior Seminar

A survey of literature’s role in anticipating and constructing potential futures since 1887. Early Anglo-American and European futurism during the years leading up to World War I; futures of speculative fiction during the Cold War; futuristic dreams of contemporary cyberpunk. What literature can reveal about the human need to understand both what is coming and how to respond to it.

ENGL 325 01 (14482) /AMST 257

Modern Apocalyptic Narratives

James Berger

T 9.25-11.15

Areas Hu

The persistent impulse in Western culture to imagine the end of the world and what might follow. Social and psychological

factors that motivate apocalyptic representations. Differences and constant features in apocalyptic representations from the Hebrew Bible to contemporary science fiction. Attitudes toward history, politics, sexuality, social class, and the process of representation in apocalyptic texts.

ENGL 459 01 (11760) /MB&B 459/EVST 215

Writing about Science, Medicine, and the Environment

Carl Zimmer

T 9.25-11.15

Skills WR

1 HTBA

YC English: Creative Writing

Advanced non-fiction workshop in which students write about science, medicine, and the environment for a broad public audience. Students read exemplary work, ranging from newspaper articles to book excerpts, to learn how to translate complex subjects into compelling prose.

Admission by permission of the instructor only. Applicants should email the instructor at carl@carlzimmer.com with the following information:

1. One or two samples of nonacademic, nonfiction writing. (No fiction or scientific papers, please.) Indicate the course or publication, if any, for which you wrote each sample.

2. A note in which you briefly describe your background (including writing experience and courses) and explain why you’d like to take the course.

ER&M 439 01 (11070) /AMST 439

Fruits of Empire

Gary Okihiro

W 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu, So

1 HTBA

Readings, discussions, and research on imperialism and “green gold” and their consequences for the imperial powers and their colonies and neo-colonies. Spatially conceived as a world-system that enmeshes the planet and as earth’s latitudes that divide the temperate from the tropical zones, imperialism as discourse and material relations is this seminar’s focus together with its implantations—an empire of plants. Vast plantations of sugar, cotton, tea, coffee, bananas, and pineapples occupy land cultivated by native and migrant workers, and their fruits move from the tropical to the temperate zones, impoverishing the periphery while profiting the core. Fruits of Empire, thus, implicates power and the social formation of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation.

EVST 007 01 (110818)

The New England Forest

Marlyse Duguid

Th 1.00-5.00

1 HTBA

Exploration of the natural history of southern New England, with specific focus on areas in and around New Haven. Pertinent environmental issues, such as climate change, endangered species, and the role of glacial and human history in shaping vegetative patterns and processes, are approached from a multi-disciplinary framework and within the context of the surrounding landscape.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

EVST 020 01 (11087) /F&ES 020

Sustainable Development in Haiti

Gordon Geballe

TTh 9.00-10.15

Skills WR

1 HTBA

The principles and practice of sustainable development explored in the context of Haiti’s rich history and culture, as well as its current environmental and economic impoverishment.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

EVST 292 01 (11030) /GLBL 217/PLSC 149

Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

Daniel Etsy

MW 1.00-2.15

Areas So

Sustainability as a guiding concept for addressing twenty-first century tensions between economic, environmental, and social progress. Using a cross-disciplinary set of materials from the “sustainability canon,” students explore the interlocking challenges of providing abundant energy, reducing pollution, addressing climate change, conserving natural resources, and mitigating the other impacts of economic development.

HIST 002 01 (14427)

Myth, Legend, and History in New England

Mark Peterson

MW 9.00-10.15

Skills WR

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

This seminar explores the complex and multi-faceted process of remembering and representing the past, using the New England region as our laboratory and drawing on the resources of Yale and the surrounding region for our tools.  Human events are evanescent—as soon as they happen, they disappear.  Yet they live on in many forms, embodied in physical artifacts and the built environment, converted to songs, stories, and legends, inscribed in written records of a thousand sorts, depicted in graphic images from paintings and sketches to digital photographs and video.  From these many sources people form and reform their understanding of the past.  In this seminar, we examine a series of iconic events and patterns deeply embedded in New England’s past and analyze the contested processes whereby historians, artists, poets, novelists, and other “remembrancers” of the past have attempted to do this essential work.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

HIST 036 01 (14047)

Utopia and Dystopia: From Classic Times to the Present in Western Culture

María Jordán

TTh 9.00-10.15

Skills WR

Areas Hu

We live in a time of dysfunctional societies but, at the same time, in a moment of ecological, egalitarian, and tolerant societies. In this class we examine utopian ideas from Antiquity to the present in Western societies, and compare them with the ones that we formulate in our days. Also, we examine the correlation between dystopias and utopias. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

HIST 141 01 (14336) /AMST 141

The American West

Travis Ross

TTh 11.35-12.25

Areas Hu

The history of the American West as both frontier and region, real and imagined, from the first contacts between Indians and Europeans in the fifteenth century to the multicultural encounters of the contemporary Sunbelt. Students work with historical texts and images from Yale’s Western Americana Collection.

HIST 369J 01 (14333)

The City in Modern East Asia

Th 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

Cities in East Asia developed into cosmopolitan urban centers in the modern era. They hosted encounters with Western empires and witnessed the rise of new forms of participatory politics; they not only reflected the broader efforts of their respective nation-states to modernize and industrialize, but also produced violent reactions against state regimes. They served as nodes in networks of migrants, commerce, and culture that grew more extensive in the modern era. In these ways, the history of East Asian urbanism is the history of the fluidity and dynamism of urban society and politics in the context of an increasingly interconnected modern world. We study cosmopolitan cities across East Asia from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. A comparative approach allows us to explore both general trends and themes, and distinct historical experiences across the countries of the region. Specific seminar topics include: urban politics, including state-society relations; cities as sites of geopolitical and imperial encounters; changes in urban society, including the impact of migration and social conflict; the urban environment, including natural and man-made disasters; urban planning, at the local, national and transnational scale; and ways of visualizing the city.

HSAR 007 01 (11377)

Art and Science

Carol Armstrong

MW 2.30-3.45

Skills WR

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

The historical relationship between art and science in the West, from the Renaissance to the present. Case studies illustrate the similarities and differences between the way artists and scientists each model the world, in the studio and the laboratory.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Please go to the following website to enter preferences for seminars: https://students.yale.edu/ocs-preference/select/select?id=2041

HSAR 410 01 (13749) /AMST 332

Humbugs and Visionaries: American Artists and Writers Before the Civil War

Bryan Wolf

Th 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu

This course examines American literature and visual culture of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. We look in particular at outliers, prophets, and self-promoters, from the radical Puritan writer Anne Bradstreet to popular entertainers like P. T. Barnum. Topics include: visuality and the public sphere; landscape and politics; genre painting and hegemony; race and identity; managerial culture and disembodied vision.  Class trips to the Yale University Art Gallery and the Metropolitan Museum (New York).

HSAR 419 01 (13968)

Art and Cognition in the Pre-Modern World

F 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

This seminar explores art as a medium for cognition and perception. Our focus is on conceptions of art and the inner-workings of the mind in the pre-modern era, with an emphasis on medieval Europe, as well as Byzantium and the medieval Islamic world. While our study concentrates on art and textual sources primarily from the Middle Ages, we also engage modern theoretical and scientific scholarship in our analyses and discussions. Throughout the course, we consider

fundamental questions concerning the way in which individuals experienced the world through art objects and material culture. Topics include the function of the senses in perception; imagination, dreams, and visions; techniques of concealment and revelation in art and ritual, the art of memory, medieval experiences of the natural world; the perception of time; the relationship between body and mind as mediated through art; and the role of vision and orality in the act of reading. The class makes frequent visits to the Yale University Art Gallery, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and other collections on campus.

HSHM 202 01 (11278) /AMST 247/FILM 244/HIST 147/HLTH 170

Media and Medicine in Modern America

John Warner

Gretchen Berland

MW 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Areas Hu

Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life.

HSHM 406 01 (11283) /HIST 150J

Healthcare for the Urban Poor

Sakena Abedin

Th 9.25-11.15

1 HTBA

Exploration of the institutions, movements, and policies that have attempted to provide healthcare for the urban poor in America from the late nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on the ideas (about health, cities, neighborhoods, poverty, race, gender, difference, etc) that shaped them. Topics include hospitals, health centers, public health programs, the medical civil rights movement, the women’s health movement, and national healthcare policies such as Medicare and Medicaid.

HSHM 416 01 (11285) /HIST 414J

Engineering the Modern Body

Rachel Elder

M 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu

1 HTBA

Exploring the human body in relationship to technology and the larger cultural processes of industrialization, medicalization, and most recently, the digital age. From Victorians who sought restoration from illness with electric belts, to the popularization of cosmetic surgery and gene therapy after World War II, students examine how the body became a canvas for a variety of personal, civic, and national goals.

HSHM 473 01 (13854) /HIST 403J

Vaccination in Historical Perspective

Jason Schwartz

Th 9.25-11.15

Areas Hu

For over two centuries, vaccination has been a prominent, effective, and at times controversial component of public health activities in the United States and around the world. Despite the novelty of many aspects of contemporary vaccines and vaccination programs, they reflect a rich and often contested history that combines questions of science, medicine, public health, global health, economics, law, and ethics, among other topics. This course examines the history of vaccines and vaccination programs, with a particular focus on the 20th and 21st centuries and on the historical roots of contemporary

issues in U.S. and global vaccination policy. Students gain a thorough, historically grounded understanding of the scope and design of vaccination efforts, past and present, and the interconnected social, cultural, and political issues that vaccination has raised throughout its history and continues to raise today.

HSHM 481 01 (11293) /AFAM 213/HIST 383J

Medicine and Race in the Slave Trade

Carolyn Roberts

W 3.30-5.20

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Examination of the interconnected histories of medicine and race in the slave trade. Topics include the medical geography of the slave trade from slave prisons in West Africa to slave ships; slave trade drugs and forced drug consumption; mental and physical illnesses and their treatments; gender and the body; British and West African medicine and medical knowledge in the slave trade; eighteenth-century theories of racial difference and disease; medical violence and medical ethics.

HSHM 487 01 (11296) /HIST 479J

Disability, Science, and Society

Rachel Elder

T 1.30-3.20

Areas Hu

Science and disability are inextricably linked. Since at least the nineteenth century, medical science and technology have helped to define disability as a ‘problem’ in need of intervention rather than as the product of increasingly stringent social norms. The medical gaze, systems of quantification, rubrics of ‘normality,’ eugenics, intelligence testing–each of these tools of science have reinforced hierarchies of difference while devaluing the experiences of persons with non-conforming

bodies and brains. In this course we explore this fairly recent history, focusing on the experiences of people with a range of disabilities through the prism of modern science, medicine, and technology. From prosthetic limbs to neuro-enhancing drugs, we examine how nineteenth and twentieth century sciences have shaped definitions and experiences of disability. Course topics include the nineteenth-century ‘invention’ of disability, medicalization and eugenics, access and infrastructure, social versus medical models of disability, notions of control and able-bodiedness, and the rise of disability activism in the final quarter of the twentieth century.

HSHM 495 01 (13853)

Medicine & U.S. Imperialism

Tess Lanzarotta

T 3.30-5.20

Areas Hu

Both “U.S. Imperialism” and “medicine” are broad categories. Imperialism can include complex formations like economic domination, the waging of war, processes of cultural assimilation, or formal territorial dispossession. Medicine, on the other hand, can include sets of beliefs and interventions ranging from vaccination campaigns, to the collection of biological specimens, to humanitarian aid, to biomedical research. Throughout the class, we question how historians have navigated these complex and shifting definitions and, in doing so, tried to make sense of the historical relationship between medicine and American empire. While this class is broadly chronological, its approach is more episodic than comprehensive. Instead of presenting a synthetic historical narrative, it offers students a nuanced understanding of important chapters in American history and leaves them with a set of conceptual and critical tools, which they can then apply to their own original research papers.

LITR 345 01 (13196) /EVST 228/HUMS 228/HIST 459J/

Climate Change and the Humanities

Katja Lindskog

MW 11.35-12.50

Areas Hu

What can the Humanities tell us about climate change? The Humanities help us to better understand the relationship between everyday individual experience, and our rapidly changing natural world. To that end, students read literary, political, historical, and religious texts to better understand how individuals both depend on, and struggle against, the natural environment in order to survive.

PLSC 420 01 (12482) /ANTH 406/EVST 424

Rivers: Nature and Politics

James Scott

Areas So

1 HTBA

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

The natural history of rivers and river systems and the politics surrounding the efforts of states to manage and engineer them.

THST 427 01 (11896) /AMST 349

Technologies of Movement Research

Emily Coates

T 10.30-12.20

1 HTBA

An interdisciplinary survey of creative and critical methods for researching human movement. Based in the motion capture studio at the Center for Collaborative Arts and Media, the course draws movement exercises and motion capture experiments together with literature from dance and performance studies, art, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, cognitive science, and the history of science to investigate the ways that artists and scholars conceive of human movement as a way of knowing the world. Students will develop their own projects over the course of the semester.  No prior experience in dance required.