Undergraduate Spring 2018

SPRING 2018 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

(CLICK HERE FOR ILLUSTRATED PDF OF SPRING 2018 UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES)

For the most up-to-date listings, check the Online Course Information website. ​To add or remove a course from this list, email environmentalhumanities@yale.edu

ANTH 473 01 (20304) /NELC588/ARCG773/ARCG473/EVST473/ANTH773/F&ES793

Abrupt Climate Change and Societal Collapse

Harvey Weiss

Th 3.30-5.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu, So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

The coincidence of societal collapses throughout history with decadal and century-scale drought events. Challenges to anthropological and historical paradigms of cultural adaptation and resilience. Examination of archaeological and historical records and high-resolution sets of paleoclimate proxies.

HSAR 445 01 (22284) 

Art, Nature, and the Modern World

Marisa Bass

Jennifer Raab

T 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Exploration of the emergence of natural history, still-life painting, collectors’ cabinets, global expeditions of discovery, and technologies for scientific sight, and looks at works by artists from Albrecht Dürer to Robert Smithson. Using images and artifacts from collections across campus, student study the unstable boundary between art and nature, a driving obsession for creative and cultural production from the Renaissance to the present.

HSAR 452 01 (22862) 

Landscape, Mobility, and Dislocation

Jennifer Raab

Tim Barringer

W 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

The study of landscape, during the long nineteenth century, as a powerful and contested artistic medium that could express the ideologies of empire, philosophies of nature, the relationship between geography and vision, and constructions of self and other. Review of such issues in American landscape painting in both a transatlantic and transhemispheric context with specific attention to works in Yale collections.

ARCG 031 01 (21198) /NELC026/EVST030/CLCV059/HIST020

Rivers and Civilization

Harvey Weiss

TTh 9.00-10.15

Spring 2018

Areas Hu, So

Permission of instructor required

The appearance of the earliest cities along the Nile and Euphrates in the fourth millennium B.C. Settlements along the rivers, the origins of agriculture, the production and extraction of agricultural surpluses, and the generation of class structures and political hierarchies. How and why these processes occurred along the banks of these rivers; consequent societal collapses and their relation to abrupt climate changes.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

ANTH 438 01 (20289) /ANTH638

Culture, Power, Oil

Douglas Rogers

W 9.25-11.15

Spring 2018

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

The production, circulation, and consumption of petroleum as they relate to globalization, empire, cultural performance, natural resource extraction, and the nature of the state. Case studies include the United States, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Venezuela, and the former Soviet Union.

AMST 358 01 (20250) /ENGL281

Animals in Modern American Fiction

James Berger

T 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Meets during reading period

Literary portrayals of animals are used to examine the relations between literature, science, and social and political thought since the late nineteenth century. Topics include Darwinist thought, socialism, fascism, gender and race relations, new thinking about ecology, and issues in neuroscience.

ER&M 287 01 (22844) /EVST287/HSAR458

Visual Culture of the National Parks

Monica Bravo

Th 2.30-4.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

How the visual culture of the national parks creates, supports, and narrates a particular vision of U.S. national identity at distinct historical moments. Topics include the growth of railroads and the highway system; the beginning of the environmental movement; and the development and popularization of photography. Careful readings of primary and secondary accounts, close analysis of advertisements, collections, films, maps, paintings, photographs, posters, videos, and other artifacts of visual culture related to the national parks.

HIST 321 01 (21236) 

China from Present to Past, 2015–600

Peter Perdue

TTh 1.30-2.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources.

AMST 330 01 (20248) /ENGL236

Dystopic and Utopian Fictions

James Berger

M 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Attempts since the late nineteenth century to imagine, in literature, cinema, and social theory, a world different from the existing world. The merging of political critique with desire and anxiety; the nature and effects of social power; forms of authority, submission, and resistance.

PHIL 467 01 (22297) /PLSC338

The Ethics of Climate Change

Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

The response of the United States to global climate change and questions of climate justice. The importance of bridging the gap between theories of climate justice and real world climate policy. Topics include the effort to fairly mitigate and adapt to climate change; the responsibility to act upon climate change by countries and individuals; and how economics, environmental, and social sciences should contribute to the conceptualization of action-guiding moral and political theories.

HIST 289J 01 (21183) /HUMS220/HSHM407/HSAR399

Collecting Nature and Art in the Preindustrial World

Paola Bertucci

M 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

A history of museums before the emergence of the modern museum. Focus on: cabinets of curiosities and Wunderkammern, anatomical theaters and apothecaries’ shops, alchemical workshops and theaters of machines, collections of monsters, rarities, and exotic specimens.

ENGL 409 01 (20949) 

Writing Nature, Revolution to Romanticism

Jonathan Kramnick

W 3.30-5.20

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Pre-1800 Literature Course

Permission of instructor required

Literary representations of the natural world, beginning with works written during the political upheaval of the mid-seventeenth century and ending with the dawn of ecological consciousness nearly two centuries later. Students examine how several major genres of environmental writing developed ideas of the national landscape as well as imperial periphery at an important moment of change.

EVST 273 01 (20996) 

Ecology and the Future of Life on Earth

Oswald Schmitz

MWF 1.30-2.20

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Sc

Study of sustainability in a new epoch of human domination of Earth, known as the Anthropocene. Students will learn to think critically and construct arguments about the ecological and evolutionary interrelationship between humans and nature and gain insight on how to combine ethical reasoning with scientific principles, to ensure that species and ecosystems will thrive and persist.

AMST 197 01 (20360) /ARCH280/HSAR219

American Architecture and Urbanism

Elihu Rubin

TTh 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Introduction to the study of buildings, architects, architectural styles, and urban landscapes, viewed in their economic, political, social, and cultural contexts, from precolonial times to the present. Topics include: public and private investment in the built environment; the history of housing in America; the organization of architectural practice; race, gender, ethnicity and the right to the city; the social and political nature of city building; and the transnational nature of American architecture.

AMST 364 01 (21038) /FILM423/EVST366/AMST834/FILM733

Documentary and the Environment

Charles Musser

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Meets during reading period

Survey of documentaries about environmental issues, with a focus on Darwin’s Nightmare (2004), An Inconvenient Truth (2006), Food, Inc. (2009), GasLand (2010), and related films. Brief historical overview, from early films such as The River (1937) to the proliferation of environmental film festivals.

AMST 163 01 (21209) /HSHM204/HIST120/EVST120

American Environmental History

Paul Sabin

TTh 11.35-12.50

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; the impact of technology, agriculture, and industry; the development of resources in the American West and overseas; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the role of planning and impact of public policies.

AFAM 450 01 (22865) /WGSS468/HUMS460

New Orleans in the American Imaginary

Joseph Fischel

Crystal Feimster

W 2.30-4.20

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Exploration of historical and contemporary New Orleans through the city’s literature, scholarship, theater, music, and food. New Orleans as both outlier and representative case of United States neoliberal economic reforms, racialized policing, casino capitalism, and hedonism.

ARCH 262 01 (21304) /HSAR332

Modern Architecture From the Enlightenment to the Millennium

Craig Buckley

Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen

TTh 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Introduction to the major buildings, projects, and debates of modern architecture and urbanism from its Enlightenment origins to the present. Consideration of design methods, representational tools, and construction techniques, which have shaped architectural practice, as well as modern architects’ complex relationship with time. Study of the built environment through relevant primary texts and secondary sources.

BRST 177 01 (20440) 

British Art and Landscape

Martin Postle

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

The role of visual art in articulating cultural, literary, political, and environmental approaches to the landscape of the British Isles in the period from 1750 to c.1850. Artists include eighteenth and nineteenth-century practitioners such as Richard Wilson, Thomas Gainsborough, J. M. W. Turner and John Constable.

E&EB 145 01 (20739) 

Plants and People

Linda Puth

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

This section requires explicit department permission. Department Pre-Approval Required

Areas Sc

Permission of instructor required

The interaction of plants and people throughout history explored from biological, historical, anthropological, and artistic perspectives. Basic botany; plants in the context of agriculture; plants as instruments of trade and societal change; plants as inspiration; plants in the environment. Includes field trips to the greenhouses at Yale Marsh Botanical Garden, the Yale Peabody Museum and Herbarium, the Yale Farm, and the Yale Art Gallery.

EVST 348 01 (21003) 

Yellowstone and Global Change

Susan Clark

W 2.30-4.20

Spring 2018

Permission of instructor required

Introduction to sustainability issues in natural resource management and policy, using the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem as a case study. Topics include large carnivores, wildlife conservation, parks, energy, and transportation.

Priority to Environmental Studies majors.

AMST 371 01 (21014) /ER&M297

Food, Race, and Migration in United States Society

Quan Tran

Th 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

Exploration of the relationship between food, race, and migration in historical and contemporary United States contexts. Organized thematically and anchored in selected case studies, this course is comparative in scope and draws from contemporary work in the fields of food studies, ethnic studies, migration studies, American studies, anthropology, and history.

ARCH 362 01 (22630) 

Urban Lab II: City Making

Staff

Th 10.30-1.20

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Permission of instructor required

How architects represent, analyze, construct, and speculate on critical urban conditions as distinct approaches to city making. Investigation of a case study analyzing urban morphologies and the spatial systems of a city through diverse means of representation that address historical, social, political, and environmental issues. Through maps, diagrams, collages and text, students learn to understand spatial problems and project urban interventions.

Prerequisites: For non-majors: permission of the instructor is required. For ARCH majors: ARCH 150, 200, 280, and 360.

HIST 361 01 (21251) /LAST361

History of Brazil

Stuart Schwartz

TTh 10.30-11.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Brazilian history from European contact to the reestablishment of civilian government in the 1990s. Focus on the multiethnic nature of Brazilian society, the formation of social and political patterns, and the relationship of people to the environment.

EP&E 497 01 (21799) /PLSC219/EVST247

Politics of the Environment

Peter Swenson

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Historical and contemporary politics aimed at regulating human behavior to limit damage to the environment. Goals, strategies, successes, and failures of movements, organizations, corporations, scientists, and politicians in conflicts over environmental policy. Focus on politics in the U.S., including the role of public opinion; attention to international regulatory efforts, especially with regard to climate change.

ENGL 258 01 (20944) 

Writing about Food

Barbara Stuart

TTh 11.35-12.50

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Permission of instructor required

Writing about food within cultural contexts. Through reading essays written by the luminaries of the food world, students explore food narratives from many angles, including family meals, recipes, cookbooks, restaurant reviews, memoir, and film.

E&EB 336 01 (21328) /HUMS336/HSHM453

Culture and Human Evolution

Gary Tomlinson

M 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Areas Hu, Sc

Permission of instructor required

Examination of the origins of human modernity in the light of evolutionary and archaeological evidence. Understanding, through a merger of evolutionary reasoning with humanistic theory, the impact of human culture on natural selection across the last 250,000 years.

CGSC 139 01 (21855) /PSYC139

The Mental Lives of Babies and Animals

Karen Wynn

TTh 2.30-3.45

Spring 2018

Areas So

Interdisciplinary exploration of the cognitive, social, and emotional capacities of creatures lacking language and culture. The extent to which our complex psychology is unique to mature humans; the relative richness of a mental life without language or culture. Some attention to particular human populations such as children with autism and adults with language disorders.

HIST 055 01 (21203) 

A History of Modern London

Becky Conekin

TTh 1.00-2.15

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Chronological and thematic exploration of modern London as a metropolitan and imperial center from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include race, gay rights, women’s rights, consumer culture, the experience of war, and the development of a multi-racial society. The fashion, food, and popular music of London emerge as important components of the city’s global identity in the twentieth century.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

EALL 210 01 (20692) /EALL510/LITR172

Man and Nature in Chinese Literature

Kang-i Sun Chang

TTh 1.00-2.15

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Readings in translation

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory.

All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 200.

LITR 420 01 (22014) /SPAN393

The Jungle Books

Roberto González Echevarría

TTh 2.30-3.45

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Readings in translation

A study of novels, stories, and films about a journey to the jungle in search of personal fulfillment and the origins of history. Authors include Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, André Malraux, Alejo Carpentier, W. H. Hudson, Claude Lévi-Strauss, José Eustasio Rivera, and Mario Vargas Llosa.

Readings and discussion in English.

HIST 307 01 (21232) /EAST301

The Making of Japan’s Great Peace, 1550–1850

Fabian Drixler

TTh 11.35-12.25

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Pre-Industrial Course

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan’s urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question of whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.

HSHM 002 01 (22610) /CLCV034/HIST037

Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

Jessica Lamont

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Examination of ancient medicine considering modern fields of pathology, surgery, pharmacology, therapy, obstetrics, psychology, anatomy, medical science, ethics, and education, to gain a better understanding of the foundations of Western medicine and an appreciation for how medical terms, theories, and practices take on different meanings with changes in science and society. All readings in English.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

HIST 444J 01 (22299) /HSHM439

Scientific Instruments and the Making of Knowledge

Charlotte Abney Salomon

Th 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

A survey of the design and use of instruments for making scientific knowledge from the Renaissance to the present. Topics include visualizing the invisible; proof and credit; standardization and precision; exploration, geography, and politics; doctor-patient interaction; and science and the public. Students have weekly hands-on interactions with historical scientific instruments from the Peabody museum collections.

HIST 239 01 (21223) 

Britain’s Empire since 1763

Stuart Semmel

TTh 11.35-12.25

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

The varieties of rule in different parts of Britain’s vast empire, from India to Africa to the West Indies. Ways in which events in one region could redirect policy in distant ones; how British observers sought to reconcile empire’s often authoritarian nature with liberalism and an expanding democracy at home; the interaction of economic, cultural, political, and environmental factors in shaping British imperial development.

HIST 140 01 (21180) /HSHM215

Public Health in America, 1793 to the Present

Naomi Rogers

TTh 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

A survey of public health in America from the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 to AIDS and breast cancer activism at the end of the past century. Focusing on medicine and the state, topics include quarantines, failures and successes of medical and social welfare, the experiences of healers and patients, and organized medicine and its critics.

HIST 146 01 (22852) /ER&M214/HLTH280/HSHM212

Historical Perspectives on Global Health

Joanna Radin

MW 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

The broader historical context of contemporary practices, policies, and values associated with the concept of global health. Historical formations around ideas about disease, colonialism, race, gender, science, diplomacy, security, economy, and humanitarianism; ways in which these formations have shaped and been shaped by attempts to negotiate problems of health and well-being that transcend geopolitical borders.

HIST 254J 01 (21227) 

Time and Place in Early Modern England

Keith Wrightson

T 1.30-3.20

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Perceptions of time and place in England and their relationships to personal and social identity, c. 1500 to 1800. Cartography, chorography, antiquarianism, conventions of timekeeping, perceptions of the life course, the creation of social memory and historical narratives, representations of social place, the effects of the Reformation, iconic places, and perceptions of previously unknown places and peoples. Use of visual and textual primary sources.

HIST 012 01 (21195) /AMST012

Politics and Society in the United States after World War II

Jennifer Klein

MW 2.30-3.45

Spring 2018

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Introduction to American political and social issues from the 1940s to the present, including political economy, civil rights, class politics, and gender roles. Legacies of the New Deal as they played out after World War II; the origins, agenda, and ramifications of the Cold War; postwar suburbanization and its racial dimensions; migration and immigration; cultural changes; social movements of the Right and Left; Reaganism and its legacies; the United States and the global economy.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

HIST 006 01 (21193) /HSHM005

Medicine and Society in American History

Staff

TTh 1.00-2.15

Spring 2018

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Disease and healing in American history from colonial times to the present. The changing role of the physician, alternative healers and therapies, and the social impact of epidemics from smallpox to AIDS.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.