Undergraduate Fall 2017

Fall 2017 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

(CLICK HERE FOR ILLUSTRATED PDF OF FALL 2017 UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES)

For the most up-to-date listings, check the Online Course Information website. ​To add or remove a course from this list, email environmentalhumanities@yale.edu

ER&M 226 01 (10306) /SOCY190/AFAM196/AMST196/EVST196

Race, Class, and Gender in American Cities

Laura Barraclough

TTh 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas So

Examination of how racial, gender, and class inequalities have been built, sustained, and challenged in American cities. Focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics include industrialization and deindustrialization, segregation, gendered public/private split, gentrification, transit equity, environmental justice, food access, and the relationships between public space, democracy, and community wellbeing. Includes field projects in New Haven.

AMST 304 01 (13386) /EVST352

Food and Documentary

Ian Cheney

T 7.00-9.00p

W 2.30-4.20

Fall 2017

Survey of contemporary public debates and current scientific thinking about how America farms and eats explored through the medium of documentary film. Includes a brief history of early food and agrarian documentaries, with a focus on twenty-first century films that consider sustainable food.

ARCG 226 01 (13240) /NELC268/EVST226/NELC605

Global Environmental History

Harvey Weiss

TTh 9.00-10.15

Fall 2017

Areas So

The dynamic relationship between environmental and social forces from the Pleistocene glaciations to the Anthropocene present. Pleistocene extinctions; transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture; origins of cities, states, and civilization; adaptations and collapses of Old and New World civilizations in the face of climate disasters; the destruction and reconstruction of the New World by the Old. Focus on issues of adaptation, resilience, and sustainability, including forces that caused long-term societal change.

ARCG 399 01 (13246) /EVST399/NELC399/F&ES774/ANTH478/NELC606

Agriculture: Origins, Evolution, Crises

Harvey Weiss

Th 3.30-5.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

Analysis of the societal and environmental drivers and effects of plant and animal domestication, the intensification of agroproduction, and the crises of agroproduction: land degradation, societal collapses, sociopolitical transformation,  ustainability, and biodiversity.

EVST 249 01 (15606) /HIST457J
Empire and Environment in American History
Eric Rutkow
W 1.30-3.20
Skills WR
Areas Hu
Permission of instructor required
The environmental dimensions of United States foreign relations from the colonial era to the present. Themes include imperialism and ideology, political economy, corporate behavior, and issues of gender, race, nationhood, and indigeneity.

EVST 255 01 (11080) /PLSC215/F&ES255

Environmental Politics and Law

John Wargo

TTh 10.30-11.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Exploration of the politics, policy, and law associated with attempts to manage environmental quality and natural resources. Themes of democracy, liberty, power, property, equality, causation, and risk. Case histories include air quality, water quality and quantity, pesticides and toxic substances, land use, agriculture and food, parks and protected areas, and energy.

ANTH 407 01 (10366) /ARCG407/ARCG707/ANTH707

Origins of Complex Societies in West Africa

Roderick McIntosh

T 2.30-4.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Archaeology

Meets during reading period

The great diversity of complex societies that emerged in prehistoric West Africa. Readings from site reports and primary source articles.

ARCH 260 01 (10467) 

History of Architecture I: Antiquity to the Baroque

Daniel Sherer

TTh 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

The first half of a two-term sequence in the history of architecture. Architecture and urbanism from ancient Egypt through Greek and Roman classical traditions to the Enlightenment. The formal expression—organizational, structural, and ornamental—and social context of specific buildings and urban areas. Architecture as a form of social expression that builds on its own stylistic development, articulating a response to changes in history and culture. Emphasis on Western architecture, with selections from other parts of the world.

ANTH 322 01 (13772) /SAST306/EVST324

Environmental Justice in South Asia

Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan

Luisa Cortesi

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

Study of South Asia’s nation building and economic development in the aftermath of war and decolonization in the 20th century. How it generated unprecedented stress on natural environments; increased social disparity; and exposure of the poor and minorities to environmental risks and loss of homes, livelihoods, and cultural resources. Discussion of the rise of environmental justice movements and policies in the region as the world comes to grips with living in the Anthropocene.

HIST 402 01 (11277) /HSHM214

Extraterrestrials in History

Ivano Dal Prete

MW 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

The notion of extraterrestrials and “radical others” in history and culture from antiquity to the present. Topics include other worlds and their inhabitants in ancient Greece; medieval debates on the plurality of worlds; angels, freaks, native Americans, and other “aliens” of the Renaissance; comet dwellers in puritan New England; Mars as a socialist utopia in the early twentieth century; and visitors from space in American popular culture.

HIST 228J 01 (11326) 

Venice and the Mediterranean, 1400–1700

Francesca Trivellato

W 3.30-5.20

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Pre-Industrial Course

Permission of instructor required

Major issues in the history of Venice and the Mediterranean in the early modern period as they emerge from the works of historians and from a reading of primary sources in English translation. Topics include travel narratives, the organization of trade, slavery, Venetian republicanism, women and gender roles, the Inquisition, ethnic and religious minorities, and relations between East and West.

HIST 260J 01 (11283) /HSHM468

Sex, Life, and Generation

Ivano Dal Prete

W 3.30-5.20

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Theories and practices of life, sex, and generation in Western civilization. Politics and policies of conception and birth; social control of abortion and infanticide in premodern societies; theories of life and gender; the changing status of the embryo; the lure of artificial life.

AMST 344 01 (13159) /ENGL433/AMST723/ENGL833

The Nonhuman in Literature since 1800

Wai Chee Dimock

W 9.25-11.15

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Nonhuman life forms in fiction and poetry from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first, including plants and animals, monsters and viruses, intelligent machines, and extraterrestrial aliens. The complexity and variety of nonhuman ecology.

HIST 467J 01 (11279) /HSHM422

Cartography, Territory, and Identity

William Rankin

M 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Exploration of how maps shape assumptions about territory, land, sovereignty, and identity. The relationship between scientific cartography and conquest, the geography of statecraft, religious cartographies, encounters between Western and non-Western cultures, and reactions to cartographic objectivity. Students make their own maps.

No previous experience in cartography or graphic design required.

AMST 188 01 (11304) /HIST115

The Colonial Period of American History

Rebecca Tannenbaum

MW 1.30-2.20

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Significant themes in American life, 1607-1750: politics and imperial governance, social structure, religion, ecology, race relations, gender, popular culture, the rhythms of everyday life.

HSAR 218L 01 (11657) /MB&B218L

Art and Biomolecular Recognition Laboratory

Andrew Miranker

TTh 2.30-4.30

Fall 2017

Areas Sc

Permission of instructor required

Meets during reading period

Students create and execute original projects in materials science using biotechnological tools. Introduction to the technical examination of art, with analysis of works from Yale University Art Gallery collections; the chemical basis of artist’s materials; applied techniques in biomolecular evolution.

This course will meet one day a week on West Campus in Room A222B and one day a week on main campus.

Prerequisite: college-level chemistry and/or biology, or the equivalent in advanced placement. Enrollment limited; preference to students not majoring in the biological sciences. Preregistration required; interested students should e-mail the instructor prior to the first week of classes.

HUMS 455 02 (13399) 

The Physics of Dance

Sarah Demers Konezny

MW 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Skills QR

Areas Hu, Sc

Permission of instructor required

Critical investigation of introductory concepts in physics through the lens of dance. Topics in physics include the normal force, friction, Newton’s laws, projectile motion, potential and kinetic energy, and conservation of energy. Topics in dance include aspects of dance history, contemporary artists who engage with science, and the development of movement studies. Class meetings include movement exercises.

Prerequisite: basic trigonometry and algebra. Prior dance experience is not required.

AMST 453 01 (12635) /THST417/ENGL425

Literature and Performance in New Orleans

Joseph Roach

TTh 11.35-12.50

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Through perspectives and approaches of English literature, American studies, African-American studies, comparative literature, and theater and performance studies, students explore the sources of creative inspiration that writers and performers find in NOLA, including its cultural mystique, its colonial history, its troubled assimilation into Anglo-North America, its tortured racial politics, its natural and built environment, its spirit-world practices, its raucous festive life, its eccentric characters, its food, its music, its predisposition to catastrophe, and its capacity for re-invention and survival.

ARCH 385 01 (11982) /SOCY149/AMST198/HIST152/PLSC279

New Haven and the American City

Elihu Rubin

Alan Plattus

TTh 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas So

Introduction to urban studies using New Haven as a model for the American city. Emphasis on historical development; urban planning; the built environment; transportation and infrastructure; reform and redevelopment; architecture and urban design; sustainability and equity.

ARCG 120 01 (11399) /HSAR200

Art and Architecture of Mesoamerica

Mary Miller

MW 11.35-12.25

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Art and architecture in Mexico and Central America from the beginnings of urban settlement to the Spanish invasion. Examination of the Olmec, Maya, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mixtec, and Aztec cultures, with particular attention to meaning and cultural identity as expressed in monumental sculpture, hand-held objects, and the built environment.

ARCH 360 01 (13012) 

Urban Lab I: An Urban World

Joyce Hsiang

Th 10.30-1.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Understanding the urban environment through methods of research, spatial analysis, and diverse means of representation that address historical, social, political, and environmental issues that consider design at the scale of the entire world. Through timelines, maps, diagrams, collages and film, students frame a unique spatial problem and speculate on urbanization at the global scale.

Prerequisites: For non-majors: permission of the instructor is required. For ARCH majors: ARCH 150, 200, and 280.

ENGL 241 01 (13384) /EVST224

Writing About The Environment

Staff

W 2.30-4.20

Fall 2017

Permission of instructor required

Exploration of ways in which the environment and the natural world can be channeled for literary expression. Reading and discussion of essays, reportage, and book-length works, by scientists and non-scientists alike. Students learn how to create narrative tension while also conveying complex—sometimes highly technical—information; the role of the first person in this type of writing; and where the human environment ends and the non-human one begins.

EP&E 390 01 (12871) /PLSC212/EVST212

Democracy and Sustainability

Michael Fotos

Th 9.25-11.15

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC EP&E: Advanced Seminar

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions.

EVST 294 01 (12198) /RUSS355/HUMS294/RSEE355

Ecology and Russian Culture

Molly Brunson

M 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Interdisciplinary study of Russian literature, film, and art from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, organized into four units—forest, farm, labor, and disaster. Topics include: perception and representation of nature; deforestation and human habitation; politics and culture of land-ownership; leisure, labor, and forced labor; modernity and industrialization; and nuclear technologies and disasters. Analysis of short stories, novels, and supplementary readings on ecocriticism and environmental humanities, as well as films, paintings, and visual materials. Several course meetings take place at the Yale Farm. Readings and discussions in English.

GLBL 217 01 (11084) /EVST292/PLSC149

Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

Daniel Esty

MW 1.00-2.15

Fall 2017

Areas So

Sustainability as an overarching framework for life in the twenty-first century. Ways in which this integrated policy concept diverges from the approaches to environmental protection and economic development that were pursued in the twentieth century. The interlocking challenges that stem from society’s simultaneous desires for economic, environmental, and social progress despite the tensions across these realms.

HUMS 367 01 (13379) 

Urban Phantasmagoria: Berlin, Vienna, and Paris

Staff

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Walter Benjamin“s Arcades Project, a print-medium display of the rise of modernity, malls, advertising, gambling, amusement parks, and urban cruising in nineteenth-century Paris, is used as a basis to examine two major German-speaking cities. Modern developments are pursued as they revolutionized urban environments and as they are documented in literary and cultural criticism.

EGYP 226 01 (12948) /NELC234

Food and Drink in Ancient Egypt

Staff

W 3.30-5.20

Fall 2017

Permission of instructor required

Investigation of how food helped shape the culture, economy, and history of ancient Egypt and the role of different foods in various social and religious settings. Consideration of the types of food eaten by various levels of society; the raw materials that could have been used as food; the domestication of plants and animals, farming techniques, irrigation, land use, and tools; and methods of cooking and preserving foods.

WGSS 120 01 (12368) 

Women, Food, and Culture

Maria Trumpler

MW 2.30-3.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Skills  [WR]

Areas So

Interdisciplinary exploration of the gendering of food production, preparation, and consumption in cross-cultural perspective. Topics include agricultural practices, cooking, pasteurization, kitchen technology, food storage, home economics, hunger, anorexia, breast-feeding, meals, and ethnic identity.

ANTH 244 01 (10345) 

Modern Southeast Asia

Erik Harms

TTh 1.00-2.15

Fall 2017

Areas So

Introduction to the peoples and cultures of Southeast Asia, with special emphasis on the challenges of modernization, development, and globalization. Southeast Asian history, literature, arts, belief systems, agriculture, industrialization and urbanization, politics, ecological challenges, and economic change.

ANTH 391 01 (10362) /ARCG391/ANTH791/ARCG791

Paleoclimate and Human Response

Roderick McIntosh

M 9.25-11.15

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Archaeology

The recursive interaction of climate change with human perception and manipulation of the landscape. Mechanisms and measures of climate change; three case studies of historical response to change at different scales.

Prerequisite: an introductory course in archaeology.

ANTH 409 01 (11093) /F&ES878/F&ES422/EVST422/ER&M394

Climate and Society from Past to Present

Michael Dove

Th 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

Discussion of the major traditions of thought—both historic and contemporary—regarding climate, climate change, and society; focusing on the politics of knowledge and belief vs disbelief; and drawing on the social sciences and anthropology in particular.

ENGL 459 01 (11677) /MB&B459/EVST215

Writing about Science, Medicine, and the Environment

Carl Zimmer

T 9.25-11.15

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Permission of instructor required

YC English: Creative Writing

Meets during reading period

Advanced non-fiction workshop in which students write about science, medicine, and the environment for a broad public audience. Students read exemplary work, ranging from newspaper articles to book excerpts, to learn how to translate complex subjects into compelling prose.

Admission by permission of the instructor only. Applicants should email the instructor at carl@carlzimmer.com with the following information:

1. One or two samples of nonacademic, nonfiction writing. (No fiction or scientific papers, please.) Indicate the course or publication, if any, for which you wrote each sample.

2. A note in which you briefly describe your background (including writing experience and courses) and explain why you’d like to take the course.

ARCH 341 01 (10468) /ARCH4216/F&ES782/GLBL253/LAST318

Globalization Space

Keller Easterling

MW 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.

CSBR 370 01 (13632) 

Exiles and Migrants in Literature and Film

Staff

W 2.30-4.30

Fall 2017

Permission of instructor required

Examination of transnational literary texts and films that illuminate how migrants, refugees, and exiles remake home away from their native countries following displacement from various causes including war, genocide, famine, racial and ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and climate change. Students explore the possibilities and limitation of creating, contesting, and imaging home in diaspora.

HIST 147 01 (11274) /HLTH170/HSHM202/AMST247/FILM244

Media and Medicine in Modern America

John Warner

Gretchen Berland

MW 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life.

HIST 222J 01 (11325) 

Russia and the Eurasian Steppe

Paul Bushkovitch

W 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Pre-Industrial Course

Permission of instructor required

A study of Russia’s interaction with the nomads of the Eurasian steppe. Topics include the Mongol invasion, the Mongol Empire in Asia and the Golden Horde, Islam, nomadic society, and the Russian state. Focus on conquest and settlement.

May count toward either European or Asian distributional credit within the History major, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies

HIST 267J 01 (11338) 

War at Sea in the Age of Sail

Evan Wilson

T 9.25-11.15

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

A study of European warfare at sea from 1500 to 1815. Themes include: the relationship between navies and societies; the experience of life at sea; the role of navies in the development of science, industry, and the state; the nature and limitations of sea power; theories of sea power; the emergence of British naval supremacy. Examination of different approaches to naval and military history.

HIST 042 01 (11295) /MMES042

Oil and Empire

Rosie Bsheer

TTh 1.00-2.15

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

The political and social history of oil since the late nineteenth century, including global trends and processes. Oil’s impact on the rise and fall of empires and the fates of nation-states; its role in war and its impact on social and cultural life. Focus on the Middle East, with some attention to Venezuela, Indonesia, and the Niger Delta.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

HIST 412J 01 (13078) /HSHM401

Critical Issues in the History of Technology

Jose Ragas

Th 3.30-5.20

Fall 2017

Permission of instructor required

A historical approach to current debates on the role of technology in society and the multiple ways people have imagined, designed, and resisted technological developments since the Industrial Revolution. Topics include how technology is transforming the world; reliance on technology to connect, to combat social inequality, and to promote democracy; whether technology has created a gap between rich and developing countries and isolated users; and how people in the past engaged with technology and what we learn from those experiences.

ANTH 414 01 (10370) /EAST575/ANTH575/EAST417

Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Helen Siu

Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer

T 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

Meets during reading period

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

HIST 445J 01 (13546) /HSHM719/HSHM454/HIST917

Natural History in History

Paola Bertucci

T 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

The changing meaning and practice of natural history, from antiquity to the present. Topics include: technologies and epistemologies of representation, the commodification of natural specimens and bioprospecting, politics of collecting and display, colonial science and indigenous knowledge, and the emergence of ethnography and anthropology. Students work on primary sources in Yale collections.

EVST 020 01 (11123) /F&ES020

Sustainable Development in Haiti

Gordon Geballe

TTh 9.00-10.15

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Permission of instructor required

The principles and practice of sustainable development explored in the context of Haiti’s rich history and culture, as well as its current environmental and economic impoverishment.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program

HIST 415J 01 (11371) /AMST318

The Problem of Global Poverty

Joanne Meyerowitz

T 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Study of the programs and policies that aimed to end global poverty from 1960 to the present, from modernization to microcredit to universal basic income. Topics include the green revolution, population control, the “women in development” movement, and the New International Economic Order. Extensive work with primary sources.

May count toward geographical distributional credit within the History major for any region studied, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies.

AMST 348 01 (10311) /EVST304

Space, Place, and Landscape

Laura Barraclough

Th 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

HIST 417J 01 (11281) /HSHM423

Biomedical Futures Since 1945

Joanna Radin

T 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Skills WR

Areas Hu

Permission of instructor required

Ideas about biomedicine’s promises and perils as they have been realized differently across place and time. Visions of the future of biomedicine that have shaped public policy, medical practice, and therapeutic innovation. Speculation about what medicine would come to look like in time. Ideas from literature, film, advertisements, policy documents, and medical texts around the world since World War II.

HSAR 297 01 (11406) 

Rembrandt’s Amsterdam

Marisa Bass

MW 10.30-11.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas Hu

Survey of the history of Amsterdam and the Dutch Golden Age through the lens of Rembrandt’s art. Topics include architecture and urban planning, landscape, history painting, portraiture, printmaking, and collecting culture. Included are visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Yale University Art Museum, and to other collections on Yale’s campus.

ANTH 406 01 (12021) /EVST424/PLSC420

Rivers: Nature and Politics

James Scott

Th 1.30-3.20

Fall 2017

Areas So

Permission of instructor required

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

The natural history of rivers and river systems and the politics surrounding the efforts of states to manage and engineer them.

ANTH 209 01 (10342) 

Anthropology of the Former Soviet Union and Eurasia

Douglas Rogers

TTh 2.30-3.20

1 HTBA

Fall 2017

Areas So

YC Anthropology: Sociocultural

Survey of transformations in Eurasia and the former Soviet Union from the 1970s to the present. Transformations in politics, culture, religion, gender, consumption patterns, national identity, natural resources, and territorial disputes; interconnections among these issues. Changes in Eurasia viewed as windows onto global transformations of knowledge, power, and culture in the early twenty-first century.